My Top 5 Mistakes on Growing a Business on Social Media

by Carrie Bobb

Trying to grow a business on social media is not as simple as I thought. It often felt like I was doing it wrong, but I didn’t really know how to do it right. Much of what I’ve learned is from the mistakes I have made along the way.

So I am sharing with you the top 5 mistakes I made while growing my business on social media to help save you some time and frustration. My hopes are you can avoid these all together or at least learn and grow from them much faster than I did.

1. POSTING TOO MUCH OR NOT ENOUGH.

I had heard that posting everyday was the way to grow. I do think that’s true. However, it only works if the content quality is high. Posting for the sake of posting never works. Consistency is extremely important. Starting with 2 posts a week that are based on really good content is way better than posting every day. The more you get into a rhythm, the easier it will become. Be consistent and bring good content

2. NOT SCHEDULING POSTS.

Posting on the fly is the worst. I was trying to be consistent and would randomly post, but it caused anxiety. Using a scheduling app like @latermedia or @planoly helps you program your content and visually see your feed in advance. We shoot to have our feeds programmed 30 days in advance and work out the details and captions a week in advance. It requires some time planning, but it is way better than scrambling. The quality is much higher as well.

3. NOT LISTENING TO MY AUDIENCE.

It took me way too long to learn how to read the Instagram Insights and Analytics. By understanding what is registering with our audience, we can give people more of what they want from us. We read the insights on every single post and understand how people are interacting with our feed. It determines how we build it.

4. DO ALL THE THINGS.

I tried to understand video, stories, programming, hashtag strategies, insights and analytics, user generated content all at the same time. Growing a business on social media is like baking a cake. You need all the ingredients, but how they mix together is extremely important. And they are kind of like layers. Take time to understand the different nuances and let them build on each other. Cut yourself some slack and focus on one thing at a time and build it right.

5. FOCUSING ON THE NUMBER OF FOLLOWERS.

It is a classic rookie mistake. A large sphere of influence is awesome! And I want that too, but it is more important to have a smaller following of the right people than a large following of the wrong audience. The engagement rate matters far more than the number of followers. The average engagement rate on an Instagram account is 4.7%. You can calculate your engagement rate on a post by adding the number of likes and number of comments and dividing that number by the total number of followers. Having a lot of followers, but no engagement is like talking to ourself. The time and effort put into growing on social is only as significant as our impact.

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a consumer behavior analytics nerd and an expert at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies.

Carrie has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. She has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

The Best Retail Leasing Talent: Identifying & Becoming Original Thought Leaders

by Carrie Bobb

The best talent in retail leasing will emerge from two groups: the young people who challenge the status quo and the veterans who care more about making our industry better than defending the way it currently stands.

The thoughts in this blog post were inspired by Adam Grant’s book Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World. While COVID accelerated the need for change in our industry, it made me wonder – how are the non-conformists in retail leasing going to change the industry?

Originality is found on the edges, in the fray. Grant writes, “Middle-status conformity leads us to choose the safety of the tried-and-true over the danger of the original.” I would like to suggest that in today’s economy, one of the riskiest places for us to be is in the safety of the tried-and-true.

Robin Arzon quote, Emily’s favorite Peloton trainer | Photo credit: Halli Photo & Co.

YOUNG TALENT

To the younger talent in the industry, this is your moment. If you have been waiting to stop drafting off those in front of you, step on the gas and become a leader, this is your window of opportunity. Grant writes, “[Novel ideas] don’t have the blinders associated with expertise, and they have little to lose by considering a fresh format and expressing enthusiasm for an unusual idea.”

Don’t just go for it with reckless abandon, dare cautiously and make your mark.

Some of the most brilliant original thought leaders in history had enough experience to know how to navigate the system, but not enough to know what rules not to break. You see things differently than those of us with more experience. Your perspective and ideas matter.

SEASONED VETERANS

To those of us who have been around the retail leasing block a time or two, we must approach new ideas with an open mind. Grant writes, “As we gain knowledge about a domain, we become prisoners of our prototypes.” It’s true. It’s hard to look at something we have stared at for a decade or two and see something new. It’s hard to unsee what we’ve always seen. Our industry needs us to create, as well as recognize original thought and test it to make change for the better.

Here are a few ways we can foster original thought and possibly change the industry:

Create lots of original content & ideas.

Creative geniuses are not necessarily better than their peers in their field of expertise, they simply come up with more ideas. Odds are in their favor. Ira Glass, the producer of This American Life and the podcast Serial said if you want to be original, “the most important possible thing you can do is do a lot of work. Do a huge volume of work.” We need thinkers. We need people who take time to think about the pain points and create not just ideas, but ideas with depth. There is a direct correlation between creative genius and the number of ideas they create.

Flip the script.

We all are experiencing some measure of pain through this pandemic. We must squeeze everything we can out of it. Make the pain pay for what has been taken. The more desperate we become, the more we think outside the box.

Let curiosity lead you.

Some of the best talent in our industry are people who have a very specific niche. It was their curiosity into certain aspects of the business that drove them to learn more. For us, it was the obsession with how the female consumer spends her money and how her purchasing power is influencing the economy both in the digital and brick and mortar space. We are fascinated with this aspect of the business. It wasn’t until we started digging out of curiosity that we discovered uncharted opportunities and we built our business around it. Let your mind wander and follow where your curiosity leads.

How we communicate new ideas matters.

The spirit in which we approach our companies, our clients and our colleagues with new ideas determines a lot about how well the ideas are received. We must approach people with a genuine interest in making something better rather than proving something wrong. Presenting ideas that go against the grain and buck the system are less likely to be supported. People want to support people and ideas that stand for something. The idea can be the same, but the difference is in how it is presented.

Carrie Bobb | Photo credit: Halli Photo & Co.

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a consumer behavior analytics nerd and an expert at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies.

Carrie has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. She has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

Purpose Over Experience: What Consumers are Telling Retail Landlords on Social Media

by Carrie Bobb & Emily Jones

Consumers are telling us what they want from our projects. If we desire to deliver an authentic experience for the community to enjoy, we should listen to what those consumers are saying. This valuable information should, without a doubt, be used for retail leasing.

Below are some of our findings through practicing social listening across our industry on social media and why it is valuable information for our leasing teams:

PURPOSE IS GREATER THAN EXPERIENCE

For the past decade, we have had experiential retail driven into everything we lease. The principle still applies and it is extremely important. But a brand’s purpose is now of equal or greater importance to consumers than the experience.

According to Deloitte’s 2020 Retail Trends Report, “An authentic purpose is now as important as digital to the next generation of customers. Brands that have a cause have more meaning in the eyes of consumers. As retailers start putting purpose at the core of their business, they will have to rethink what they stand for and define the commercial model required to deliver it.”[1]

If we want to attract and lease space to meaningful, relevant brands, we need to meet them where they meet their customers. Landlord companies are a brand too. And the more we adapt and align with retailers, the more likely we will collaborate and do business together.

Accenture’s report From Me to We: The Rise of the Purpose-Led Brand, included, “Consumers’ expectations that brands align with their personal values is a challenge for companies that underestimated the bottom-line impact of neglecting to stand for something bigger than what they sell. Or falsely believed they could avoid taking a position on hot-button issues…the opportunity lies in building more authentic and profitable relationships with customers. Meaningful relationships that shift the customer dialogue from ‘give ME what I want’ to ‘support the ideals WE believe in.’”[2]

ENGAGEMENT RATE MATTERS MORE THAN THE NUMBER OF FOLLOWERS.

Having a strong engagement rate with the right audience is more valuable than having more followers who are not the core consumer base.

Engagement rates matter A LOT to retailers. If we can show retailers we have a strong following of their core customer and they are actively engaged on the property, it matters for leasing. It is a proof source that their audience is already vested.

PEOPLE CARE ABOUT COMMUNITY PROPERTIES AND ARE SEEKING OUT OPPORTUNITIES TO ENGAGE.

In researching various retail projects and the different comments people are making, people want to be part of creating something great in their community. They genuinely care about the places and businesses in their neighborhoods and have come out strong for the businesses they love.

People are emotionally connected to their favorite stores and restaurants, now more than ever, and they want to be part of helping them be successful. Consumers have a vested interest in the places and properties as much as the brands – if not more, in some cases. The properties where they meet their friends and create memories are deeply meaningful when the property engages back.

Here is one example: Often times people leave comments about the different types of retailers or restaurants they would like to see be part of the project without ever being prompted. This is great information to pull together and turn into a report to present to potential tenants. It shows them their customer is already in the market. 

MANAGING SOCIAL MEDIA POORLY IS WORSE THAN NOT DOING IT AT ALL.

Scott Stratten, the creator of the Brand Pulse principle, believes there is no neutral position between a brand and a consumer. Each interaction either increases or reduces a person’s affinity for the brand.

“Increased frequency doesn’t imperil your success in social media marketing. Instead, your success is mitigated every time you post something mediocre, or worse.” Posts that resonate strongly with your audience are rewarded. Lame posts are hidden.

A picture containing drawing

Description automatically generated
Scott Stratten’s Brand Pulse Concept

“If you don’t have something worthwhile to say, DON’T SAY IT. When you decide to push publish anyway, you are digging yourself a deeper and deeper hole with the social media algorithms,” wrote Jay Baer on his blog about the Brand Pulse theory.[3]

This is important when considering the different audiences – the community visiting and experiencing the project, its core customer, as well as prospective tenants.

Social media and social shopping are impacting our purchasing decisions. It’s changed the way people are consuming everything – from retail to news to staying connected with friends. It’s at our fingertips. The phone is in our hand at all times. The access is powerful.

To learn more about social media analytics, you can check out our blog on How to Read Instagram Insights.

Carrie and Emily nerd out on consumer behavior analytics and are experts at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies. They have each been leasing retail for 17 years and have leased some of the most notable projects in Southern California.

They have executed transactions with retailers such as SoulCycle, Sephora, drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Burger Lounge, Casero Taqueria, Mendocino Farms, Bird Rock Coffee and several others.


[1] https://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/consumer-business/articles/retail-trends.html?fbclid=IwAR0MOpdMO2srbMfFmCRX6n43z9kloGs7bQt_XDLN_B8tsBv9LnlXmoQDv64#

[2] https://www.accenture.com/_acnmedia/thought-leadership-assets/pdf/accenture-competitiveagility-gcpr-pov.pdf

[3] https://www.convinceandconvert.com/social-media-strategy/the-truth-about-how-often-to-post-in-social-media/

How to Read Instagram Insights

and why it matters for retail leasing…

by Carrie Bobb

Many of the demographics we rely on in retail leasing is available to landlords through their own social media accounts. There is so much consumer data available to property owners that they already have access to in their property Instagram account.

Through practicing social listening, retailers actively analyze their social media insights and listen to their audience.  From there, they adapt their messages and content creation to give their audience more of what they want. The same applies for commercial real estate.

This is a quick crash course into how you can easily access your property’s demos, validate your audience, and express their desired preferences to prospective tenants.

WHERE TO FIND INSTAGRAM INSIGHTS

An Instagram business or public account comes with insights into the accounts and audience trends. In the upper right corner of the profile is the menu. Click on that and then select Insights.

DEMOGRAPHICS

To learn about the demographics of your audience, select the followers link and it will take you to your follower breakdown. This will tell you how many followers you have gained and lost this week, where they are located, age, gender and even the most active time of day to post.

This is a screen shot of our company followers. We know our audience is 68% female with 72% of them being between the ages of 25-44. (If you tap on men or women next to the Age Range, it will tell you what percentage are in the different age ranges.)

There are a lot more insights to learn about by exploring through the different sections in Insights. Some insights Instagram only keeps for a week, so it is important to be using software or an app that tracks the analytics so we can turn them into leasing tools month over month.

SOCIAL LISTENING

Some of the post powerful data is discovered by reading through each post and understanding what is registering and what is not with our audiences. We can read the insights from a single post and understand what is trending and what is falling flat. With each set of insights, we get to understand our audience a little more.

This is extremely valuable when it comes to defining our actual consumers to prospective tenants.

This is an example of a recent post of ours. If you click on View Insights, and then swipe up, the full screen becomes various data points for this one post.

There is a subtle difference between reach and impressions. A single reach is counted once per account no matter how many times they view it. An impression is every single time the post is seen. If a user scrolls through their feed 5 times, each time they scroll by it counts as an impression.

ENGAGEMENT RATES

Each time a user likes, comments, shares or saves a post, it counts as engagement. The algorithm rewards posts that have a strong engagement rate. For posts that lack engagement, they are hidden.

Instagram only shows each post to about 10% of your followers. They more they engage, the more the post gets pushed to other users feeds. Posts that don’t get engagement, don’t get pushed to feeds.

The average account has an engagement rate of 4%. To have a high engagement rate means we are listening to our audience and giving them content and information they find valuable.

This resonates with retailers and is meaningful to how they are growing their businesses both digitally and through brick and mortar.

WHY THIS MATTERS FOR RETAIL LEASING

Retailers understand these insights far better than most in commercial real estate. If we can show prospective tenants we are engaged with the community and the community is made up of their actual consumer, it matters.

It matters to retailers who may lease space because they are leaning heavy on this for their own business. When we can speak their language and provide engagement reports that meet them in the same space where they meet their customer, it matters…a lot.

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a consumer behavior analytics nerd and an expert at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies.

Carrie has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. She has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

Content Ideas for Retail Landlords, Brokers, Brokerage Firms and Asset Managers

by Carrie Bobb

While retail shopping centers are shut down, several people in the industry have been asking us about how we are creating content. Our secret is…it begins and ends with people…always.

Eric and Alejandra Meyers, the owners of Lofty Coffee, along with Krystal, the Director of Operations. Krystal welcomed a healthy baby boy during quarantine.

The people are the best part of any project. The stories behind businesses and the people who keep retail projects running are the driving force behind any successful project. Now is a good time to shift the focus from the asset or property to the people. The biggest mistake any of us could be making right now is to continue posting and talking about take out opportunities.

Below are a few ideas based upon the statistics from the Edelman Trust Barometer 2020 Special Report: Brand Trust and the Coronavirus Pandemic. All stats listed are pulled from their report.

90% of Americans want to see brands who are protecting the well-being and financial security of their employees.

Include inspirational stories of retailers and tenants in your project who are taking care of their employees in unique ways.

84% of Americans want brands to use social media channels to facilitate a sense of community.

Make it personal. Showcase the amazing people in your projects that make it great. Build and strengthen the community and relationships through social media.

84% of Americans want brands to be a reliable news source.

Share updates, keeping your followers informed on how you, your tenants or the industry is making progress or taking steps to fight the virus and support businesses.

88% expect brands to keep the public fully informed regarding changes in how the brand is operating.

As we get closer to recovery, be thinking about communicating messages of safety and some of the steps taken in regard to operations.

71% agree that brands who place profits over people during the crisis will lose their trust forever.

Tell stories about people. Be genuine and thoughtful. Share a photo of the property manager and what she has in her Netflix que. Feature a security guard who is keeping the property safe. What music is on his playlist? The college kid running curbside delivery. What is the best order he has seen come through?

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a consumer behavior analytics nerd and an expert at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies.

Carrie has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. She has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

Rebuilding After Loss

by Carrie Bobb

In 2018, I was blindsided. The business I spent 15 years building, that I absolutely loved, slipped through my fingers like water.

About this time last year, I began to pick up the pieces and rebuild. I learned, and am learning still, some valuable lessons about rebuilding a business after loss. No two stories are the same, nor do I feel like I have all the answers. My desire is to share what I am learning through the process, in order to spark hope and courage in someone else who might be rebuilding.

  • Adjust our compass. When the world is upside down and spinning, it’s hard to find our bearings. It can feel like we are twisting and turning and plummeting and we can’t tell which way is up. If we begin with finding the horizon, everything else will adjust. We must find our True North and get back to the fundamentals of why we built our businesses in the first place.
  • Define the waterline clearly. As the business owners or captains of our ship, we must delegate well. However, no one makes a decision below the waterline of our boat without talking with us first. We cannot afford to take on any more water. This lesson has cost me time, money and heartache. We must delegate with extreme clarity. People must understand what is within their authority and what is not. Not being clear what is within and outside their ability to make a call, will cost us.
  • Remember to float. Right now it is about how long we can tread water. In moments of panic, when we fear we are close to drowning, we need to remind ourselves to float. We need to take a deep breath and conserve energy. Our bodies and minds need to rest, so when it is time to swim, we haven’t worn ourselves out treading water. Part of being prepared is taking care of ourselves mentally, physically, spiritually and emotionally. Our teams and our businesses need us to be the best version of ourselves when it’s time to go.
  • Build it different. Make it meaningful. The advantage of rebuilding is we can do it different. We can make it better. We can learn new ways to do things and add more meaning and value than we thought possible. We can create meaningful goods and services by being curious and relentlessly learning how to make something better. If you were going to build it over again, what would you do different?
  • Give purpose to the pain. Deep pain can be the catalyst to finding our purpose. And it usually begins with helping someone else. If we take what we learn through our struggle and use it to help someone, it doesn’t make the pain go away. But it does give a value to the disappointment and pain where there once was only loss. The events that took something precious, are now being used to give something precious to someone who needs it. And that is powerful.

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a consumer behavior analytics nerd and an expert at driving revenue for retail properties through digital and brick and mortar leasing strategies.

Carrie has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. She has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

Landlords Who Lead: 5 Ways to Respond to Coronavirus

by Carrie Bobb

1. Acknowledge there is a problem. It effects large and small businesses. In McKinsey & Company’s report on Leadership in a Crisis, it said “Early in a crisis, if leaders display excessive confidence in spite of obviously difficult conditions, they can lose credibility. It is more effective for a leader to project confidence that the organization will find a way through its tough situation but also show that they recognize the crisis’ uncertainty and have begun to grapple with it by collecting more information.”[1]

2. Create an opportunity for people to do something to support local businesses during this time. This is an opportunity for the community to see your heart in a different way.

Here is how the Icon Method shared how to support local businesses:

Iconmethod Instagram

3. Highlight some of the businesses you love – whether they are in your project or not. It’s a way to get outside your own property lines.

Below is an example of how Sugar Paper gave a shout out to other local businesses in an email.

SugarPaper email giving a shout out to other local businesses.

4. Give leadership opportunities to team members. Empower people on the ground to work with existing tenants. Allow people the opportunity to respond within set boundaries.

5. Have empathy. Don’t just express it. Actually have it. There is a difference. It is the best response anyone can have in a crisis. Something as simple as saying “I’m sorry,” can go a long way.

Every problem has within it an opportunity to learn and grow. Some opportunities only come around once. And if we look close enough at the problem, we can find an opportunity to do good.[2]

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is a student of social media and a consumer behavior analytics nerd.

She has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. Carrie has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.


[1] https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/leadership-in-a-crisis-responding-to-the-coronavirus-outbreak-and-future-challenges?cid=other-eml-alt-mip-mck&hlkid=37fc9d2ecd944a61a227b410ffa855ee&hctky=11613830&hdpid=16a43b5b-480b-4b3b-b8cf-bc20fcc11b08

[2] Paraphrase of What Do You Do With A Problem? By Kobi Yamada.

3 Retail Subscriptions I Can’t Live Without

by Claire Plecha

Billie

Billie razor subscription | Photo: Techcrunch.com

Are you tired of paying the extra 10-15% “pink tax” on women’s razors? Enter Billie: a subscription service that offers razors specifically made for women, at half the price of in-store brands. Whereas a 4-pack of Venus cartridges will set you back $20, you can score 4 Billie cartridges for only $9. Billie not only lets you pick the color of your razor, but also tailors the frequency of your deliveries based on how regularly you shave. I was initially overly optimistic about how often I would shave my legs (sigh), and after amassing what might possibly be a lifetime supply of cartridges, I was able to adjust my delivery to every 3 months.

If you hate free shipping, love going out of your way to buy something that could have been sent to your house, or enjoy nothing more than overpaying for razors, then Billie is not for you. I’m guessing this is not the case. Side note – the razors leave my legs silky smooth, I have experienced minimal carnage, and in such cases it was almost certainly due to user error (i.e. “let’s see if I can shave my entire body in 30 seconds”).

Care/Of

Until recently, the last time I remember religiously taking vitamins was in college, when my sweet mom would include gummy vitamins in all of my care packages. Whether it be a cost or convenience factor, I just never seemed to be able to make it a consistent part of my routine, until I discovered Care/of. Care/of assesses your unique health goals and diet to create a personalized blend of vitamins made just for you. No more counting out vitamins each morning, because let’s be honest, no one has time for that. Care/of does the work for you – dividing the vitamins into daily pouches that include an inspirational quote or daily challenge, such as “take a picture of the sunset”. Not only are Care/of vitamins convenient and perfect for travel, but they also are more cost efficient than buying vitamins individually.

Scentbird

Scentbird | Photo: www.scadconnector.com

This might be my favorite subscription service to date. I absolutely love perfume, but always stick to my tried and true scents – never quite able to pull the trigger on a pricey new fragrance. However, my signature scent was recently compromised when the unfathomable happened: my grandmother started wearing my precious Viktor and Rolf Flowerbomb. Because wearing the same perfume as an 88 year old is disastrous for my personal brand (please indulge me, obviously I do not have a personal brand), I found myself in the market for something new. With ScentBird, you can “date perfumes before marrying them”, letting you choose from over 500 designer scents every month. “Why do I need to date perfumes?” you might ask. Because perfume smells different from one person to the next, based on the pH balance of the wearer’s skin. This might explain why the cult favorite “Glossier You” smells divine on most subscribers, but made me smell like I had walked through a cloud of ground black pepper. I wish I was exaggerating.

Each month ScentBird sends you a generous 30 day supply, allowing you to gauge the perfume’s staying power, and decide if it’s something you could commit to as a signature scent. Browse by ratings, preferred scent notes, occasion (date night, office, workout…apparently this is a thing) or even based on fragrances you know and love (“If you like Versace Bright Crystal, you’ll love TOCCA Cleopatra”). Select the ones you would like to try and create your “queue” à la early days of Netflix. My favorite thus far is Nest Black Tulip. My grandma will have to pry this one from my cold dead hands.

Claire Plecha is the Director of Communications at Carrie Bobb & Co. and a subscription retail junkie. She spearheads all marketing, public relations and transactional support for CB&Co. Prior to CB&Co., Claire came from Manchester Financial Group where she was the Director of External Affairs overseeing corporate marketing, media relations and community outreach.

In the Company of Women

by Carrie Bobb

As our family waited for the killer whale show to start at Sea World, we watched a video among a few thousand other people about the ocean. Trivia questions would pop up for the audience to participate. The answer to “If an orca whale and a great white shark got into a fight, who would win?” stopped me dead in my tracks while handing my son popcorn.

Pod of orca whales | Photo credit: Shutterstock

The orca wins every time because the females lead the orca pods. They work together on everything from raising their young to defending the pod. A shark hunts alone and a killer whale hunts with the pod. It’s not a competition. Not even close. Therefore, the orca whale is at the top of the oceanic food chain and has no predator.

It reminded me of lions. When it’s time to hunt, the male lion lets out a roar, clearly staking his claim at the top of the food chain. It can be heard up to five miles away and causes prey to hightail it in the opposite direction.

But it is the pride, the group of lionesses, that are the hunters, hidden in the tall grass motionless waiting and working together for their prey. The lion is at the top of the African savanna food chain.[1]

As part of Intel’s blog, We Are Intel, the company wrote, “At Intel, our vision is simple and direct: diversity drives innovation…We need different creative prospectives, and that means building a workplace where diversity and inclusion thrive.”[2]

In the Company of Women by Grace Bonney | Photo credit: Halli Photo & Co.

As part of the company’s Diversity & Inclusion report, “Intel has achieved full representation in its US workforce two years ahead of its 2020 goal. The company’s workforce now reflects the percent of women and underrepresented minorities available in the US skilled labor market.”

It went on to say, “Retention of women also continues to be a priority at Intel…The company offers several programs to support women through career progression, including ‘Pay It Forward’, a mentoring program scaled to support 6,000 female mid-level employees, and ‘Women at Intel Network.’” It is worth noting that the Women at Intel Network is the company’s largest employee resource group supporting more than 7,000 employees globally.[3]

With annual sales exceeding $70 billion a year, Intel is easily the largest semiconductor company in the world. The company has been listed as Best Employers for Diversity, World’s Best Employers, Best Employers for New Grads, Best Employers for Women, World’s Most Valuable Brands, America’s Best Employers, America’s Largest Public Companies and many others.

Having met with Intel and witnessed their company culture, I can attest to how much their employees love the company. I mean, they genuinely love working at Intel. The value of diversity is evident meeting with people, walking through their campus and participating in corporate settings.

The top of the food chain is not female. The companies (or species) are those who have females working well together.

HOW TO BUILD A CULTURE FOR WOMEN TO COLLABORATE

Foster a culture of teamwork. Women’s networks and organizations supporting women within companies are because it creates an environment for ideas and bridging gaps where the results can be exponential. Carve out space for workshops or business planning sessions where women can come up with new ways to work together to hunt, protect the pack and grow the company.

Reese Witherspoon & advocating for women | Source: vogue.com

Community over competition. Women can be our own worst enemy. We have all seen mean girls in middle school and in the office. This is different than competition. Fostering community builds trust so together we can compete strong. We don’t benefit if we are competing with each other. Strong community builds stronger individuals with more confidence to express ideas and drive results. Kim Scott put it this way, “If you want your team to achieve something bigger than you could achieve alone, if you want to ‘burst the bounds of your brain,’ you have to care about the people you are working with.” Curating a community makes room for companies to achieve bigger things together.

Leave space. When we fill up every inch of our calendars or agendas with how we think something should be done or how it should look, we don’t leave room for something better. And it’s simply because we can’t see it. By creating space and leaving room for diversity and inclusion in our companies, we are leaving room for better.

When women work together, not just for the common good of women, but for the good of the entire pack, magic happens. Companies who see it and embrace it grow closer to the top of the food chain. Or in Intel’s case, remain at the top. 

Photo credit: Halli Photo & Co.

Carrie is the founder and CEO of Carrie Bobb & Co. She is passionate about companies who do good, empowering people and she is a consumer behavior analytics nerd.

She has closed over $2 billion in total consideration throughout her career. Carrie has completed transactions with brands such as Sephora, SoulCycle, Drybar, Fox Restaurant Concepts, Restoration Hardware and many others. She has implemented leasing strategies through social media and online influencer programming on several projects. She was named one of San Diego’s Power Women in Real Estate and received her MBA from the University of San Diego. Carrie lives in San Diego with her husband, Matt, their three inquisitively adventurous kids and one joyful golden doodle.

[1] https://study.com/academy/lesson/the-food-chain-of-a-lion.html

[2] https://blogs.intel.com/jobs/2018/07/women-of-intel/#gs.wiydx8

[3] https://newsroom.intel.com/news/intel-achieves-goal-full-us-workforce-representation-notes-just-beginning/#gs.wiyr2z